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1 District Hospital, Nanango, Qld ROSSOW, Carl "Charles August" (I60)
 
2 "Adelaide" arrived 22 June 1848, ship 539 tons, from England 13 March 1848. Captain Stephen Wharton, Surgeon Superintindent James Barlas.
Brought 268 immigrants, being 177 English, with some Irish and Scots. Six babies were born and only 5 deaths.

William aged 33, labourer, can neither read or write and his wife Mary (Gardner) aged 32, who can read and write, arrived in 1848 with their 4 children George 10 (cannot read nor write), Elizabeth 6 (cannot read nor write), Edmund 4 (cannot read nor write, and Mary Infant (born on the journey). Their religion being Church of England.

Notes for WILLIAM STEELE:
New South Wales, Australia, Assisted Immigrant Passenger Lists, 1828-1896 about William Steel
Name: William Steel
Birth Year: abt 1815
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Arrival Date: 22 Jun 1848
Vessel Name: Adelaide
Origin Location: Newbury, Berkshire, England

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Wednesday 7 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711348

The ship Adelaide, 639 tons, Wharton, was to sail from London on the 10th, and Plymouth on the 20th February, with emigrants for Port Phillip.

Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), Saturday 24 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91457855

The Adelaide arrived here yesterday, ninety eight days out. She spoke the Seringapatam for Sydney on the 8th instant, in long. 98 east, lat. 43 south, 100 days. This vessel had sprung a leak the day before, but not of much consequence. The emigrants by the Adelaide are of a superior description, being principally English, and the Scotch and Irish sprinkled among them appear to be of an improved quality. We were unable to obtain her manifest in consequence of the captain imagining that he would injure the consignees by allowing it to be published. We learned, however, that her cargo consisted of but a few hogsheads of rum and brandy. The latest paper on board was dated 5th March, but we hear that a mail was put on board at Plymouth on the 13th of the same month. There is no additional political uews of interest to communicate, at least we were so informed by Captain Wharton. The mail is a very large one. The doctor informs us that there were five births and one death (a female) during the passage. Patriot. 
STEELE, William (I19865)
 
3 "Adelaide" arrived 22 June 1848, ship 539 tons, from England 13 March 1848. Captain Stephen Wharton, Surgeon Superintindent James Barlas.
Brought 268 immigrants, being 177 English, with some Irish and Scots. Six babies were born and only 5 deaths.

William aged 33, labourer, can neither read or write and his wife Mary (Gardner) aged 32, who can read and write, arrived in 1848 with their 4 children George 10 (cannot read nor write), Elizabeth 6 (cannot read nor write), Edmund 4 (cannot read nor write, and Mary Infant (born on the journey). Their religion being Church of England.

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Wednesday 7 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711348

The ship Adelaide, 639 tons, Wharton, was to sail from London on the 10th, and Plymouth on the 20th February, with emigrants for Port Phillip.

Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), Saturday 24 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91457855

The Adelaide arrived here yesterday, ninety eight days out. She spoke the Seringapatam for Sydney on the 8th instant, in long. 98 east, lat. 43 south, 100 days. This vessel had sprung a leak the day before, but not of much consequence. The emigrants by the Adelaide are of a superior description, being principally English, and the Scotch and Irish sprinkled among them appear to be of an improved quality. We were unable to obtain her manifest in consequence of the captain imagining that he would injure the consignees by allowing it to be published. We learned, however, that her cargo consisted of but a few hogsheads of rum and brandy. The latest paper on board was dated 5th March, but we hear that a mail was put on board at Plymouth on the 13th of the same month. There is no additional political uews of interest to communicate, at least we were so informed by Captain Wharton. The mail is a very large one. The doctor informs us that there were five births and one death (a female) during the passage. Patriot. 
STEELE, Edmund (I19916)
 
4 "Adelaide" arrived 22 June 1848, ship 539 tons, from England 13 March 1848. Captain Stephen Wharton, Surgeon Superintindent James Barlas.
Brought 268 immigrants, being 177 English, with some Irish and Scots. Six babies were born and only 5 deaths.

William aged 33, labourer, can neither read or write and his wife Mary (Gardner) aged 32, who can read and write, arrived in 1848 with their 4 children George 10 (cannot read nor write), Elizabeth 6 (cannot read nor write), Edmund 4 (cannot read nor write, and Mary Infant (born on the journey). Their religion being Church of England.

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Wednesday 7 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711348

The ship Adelaide, 639 tons, Wharton, was to sail from London on the 10th, and Plymouth on the 20th February, with emigrants for Port Phillip.

Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), Saturday 24 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91457855

The Adelaide arrived here yesterday, ninety eight days out. She spoke the Seringapatam for Sydney on the 8th instant, in long. 98 east, lat. 43 south, 100 days. This vessel had sprung a leak the day before, but not of much consequence. The emigrants by the Adelaide are of a superior description, being principally English, and the Scotch and Irish sprinkled among them appear to be of an improved quality. We were unable to obtain her manifest in consequence of the captain imagining that he would injure the consignees by allowing it to be published. We learned, however, that her cargo consisted of but a few hogsheads of rum and brandy. The latest paper on board was dated 5th March, but we hear that a mail was put on board at Plymouth on the 13th of the same month. There is no additional political news of interest to communicate, at least we were so informed by Captain Wharton. The mail is a very large one. The doctor informs us that there were five births and one death (a female) during the passage. Patriot. 
STEELE, Elizabeth (I19869)
 
5 "Adelaide" arrived 22 June 1848, ship 539 tons, from England 13 March 1848. Captain Stephen Wharton, Surgeon Superintindent James Barlas.
Brought 268 immigrants, being 177 English, with some Irish and Scots. Six babies were born and only 5 deaths.

William aged 33, labourer, can neither read or write and his wife Mary (Gardner) aged 32, who can read and write, arrived in 1848 with their 4 children George 10 (cannot read nor write), Elizabeth 6 (cannot read nor write), Edmund 4 (cannot read nor write, and Mary Infant (born on the journey). Their religion being Church of England.

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Wednesday 7 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711348

The ship Adelaide, 639 tons, Wharton, was to sail from London on the 10th, and Plymouth on the 20th February, with emigrants for Port Phillip.

Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), Saturday 24 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91457855

The Adelaide arrived here yesterday, ninety eight days out. She spoke the Seringapatam for Sydney on the 8th instant, in long. 98 east, lat. 43 south, 100 days. This vessel had sprung a leak the day before, but not of much consequence. The emigrants by the Adelaide are of a superior description, being principally English, and the Scotch and Irish sprinkled among them appear to be of an improved quality. We were unable to obtain her manifest in consequence of the captain imagining that he would injure the consignees by allowing it to be published. We learned, however, that her cargo consisted of but a few hogsheads of rum and brandy. The latest paper on board was dated 5th March, but we hear that a mail was put on board at Plymouth on the 13th of the same month. There is no additional political uews of interest to communicate, at least we were so informed by Captain Wharton. The mail is a very large one. The doctor informs us that there were five births and one death (a female) during the passage. Patriot. 
STEELE, George William (I19868)
 
6 "Adelaide" arrived 22 June 1848, ship 539 tons, from England 13 March 1848. Captain Stephen Wharton, Surgeon Superintindent James Barlas.
Brought 268 immigrants, being 177 English, with some Irish and Scots. Six babies were born and only 5 deaths.

William aged 33, labourer, can neither read or write and his wife Mary (Gardner) aged 32, who can read and write, arrived in 1848 with their 4 children George 10 (cannot read nor write), Elizabeth 6 (cannot read nor write), Edmund 4 (cannot read nor write, and Mary Infant (born on the journey). Their religion being Church of England.

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Wednesday 7 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711348

The ship Adelaide, 639 tons, Wharton, was to sail from London on the 10th, and Plymouth on the 20th February, with emigrants for Port Phillip.

Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), Saturday 24 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91457855

The Adelaide arrived here yesterday, ninety eight days out. She spoke the Seringapatam for Sydney on the 8th instant, in long. 98 east, lat. 43 south, 100 days. This vessel had sprung a leak the day before, but not of much consequence. The emigrants by the Adelaide are of a superior description, being principally English, and the Scotch and Irish sprinkled among them appear to be of an improved quality. We were unable to obtain her manifest in consequence of the captain imagining that he would injure the consignees by allowing it to be published. We learned, however, that her cargo consisted of but a few hogsheads of rum and brandy. The latest paper on board was dated 5th March, but we hear that a mail was put on board at Plymouth on the 13th of the same month. There is no additional political uews of interest to communicate, at least we were so informed by Captain Wharton. The mail is a very large one. The doctor informs us that there were five births and one death (a female) during the passage. Patriot. 
STEELE, Mary (I19870)
 
7 "Adelaide" arrived 22 June 1848, ship 539 tons, from England 13 March 1848. Captain Stephen Wharton, Surgeon Superintindent James Barlas.
Brought 268 immigrants, being 177 English, with some Irish and Scots. Six babies were born and only 5 deaths.

William aged 33, labourer, can neither read or write and his wife Mary (Gardner) aged 32, who can read and write, arrived in 1848 with their 4 children George 10 (cannot read nor write), Elizabeth 6 (cannot read nor write), Edmund 4 (cannot read nor write, and Mary Infant (born on the journey). Their religion being Church of England.

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Wednesday 7 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article711348

The ship Adelaide, 639 tons, Wharton, was to sail from London on the 10th, and Plymouth on the 20th February, with emigrants for Port Phillip.

Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851), Saturday 24 June 1848, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article91457855

The Adelaide arrived here yesterday, ninety eight days out. She spoke the Seringapatam for Sydney on the 8th instant, in long. 98 east, lat. 43 south, 100 days. This vessel had sprung a leak the day before, but not of much consequence. The emigrants by the Adelaide are of a superior description, being principally English, and the Scotch and Irish sprinkled among them appear to be of an improved quality. We were unable to obtain her manifest in consequence of the captain imagining that he would injure the consignees by allowing it to be published. We learned, however, that her cargo consisted of but a few hogsheads of rum and brandy. The latest paper on board was dated 5th March, but we hear that a mail was put on board at Plymouth on the 13th of the same month. There is no additional political uews of interest to communicate, at least we were so informed by Captain Wharton. The mail is a very large one. The doctor informs us that there were five births and one death (a female) during the passage. Patriot. 
GARDINER, Mary (I19866)
 
8 "August worked in the Ipswich mines just as his father did. He married into a staunch christian family that belonged to the Church of Christ. Both August and Martha taught Sunday School. They moved from Ipswich in or around 1912- 1914 and bought a dairy farm where they raised fresian cattle. They called their farm "Silverleaf" which was in the Murgon district of Queensland. They killed their own meat, cow or pig and corned meat was always on the menu when visitors arrived. Sausages and metwurst were a speciality and was always available." DENNIEN, August Friedrich Wilhelm (I19157)
 
9 "Charles Dickens" departed 5 April 1877 from Hamburg arriving at Moreton Bay on 17 July 1877

HOFFMANN August, Gelsenkirchen, Westphalen, Arbeiter, 23

The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), 18 July 1877, page 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1365122

The Charles Dickens, ship, from Hamburg, with immigrants, arrived at the anchorage, Brisbane Roads, yesterday afternoon. From our local columns it will be seen that the vessel has been refused pratique.

and on the same day ........

THE ship Charles Dickens, which arrived in Moreton Bay on Saturday, with 508 immigrants, from Hamburg, was visited by the health officer at half-past two o'clock yesterday afternoon, when the surgeon-superintendent, Dr. Uterhardt, reported that during the voyage, which lasted 100 days, there had been much sickness, more particularly amongst the children, there having been no less than sixty cases of measles, two of which proved fatal - one death from this cause occurring on the 6th and the other on the 7th of the current month, about a week before the end of the voyage. There were altogether eighteen deaths and five births. The deaths were all of children, except two, viz., Anna Maria Brener, a married woman, aged twenty-eight years, who died of acute odema cerebri; and Therese Frieberg, a single girl, aged twenty-two, who died of peritonitis. The other deaths were of children from four years downwards, the greater number being infants - two died from diptheria, three from bronchitis, two from pneumonia, two from phthisis, two from convulsions, one from cramps, one from Bright's disease, and one from apoplexy. It is not stated whether measles still prevails on board, but we may assume that it does, the two deaths from this cause having occurred within a few days of the ship's arrival in port. Neither is any reason given for the occurrence of so much sickness; but the number of children on board at the date of sailing was 172, which may be considered far too large a number of children for one vessel. The health officer ordered Captain Bochwoldt to hoist the yellow flag, and has recommended that the ship and passengers be placed in quarantine. It is expected that a Gazette Extraordinary will issue to-day ordering the ship into quarantine, and she will probably be towed over to Peel Island to-day or to-morrow. The immigrants are mostly German, but we notice in the list a goodly sprinkling of Polish names. 
HOFFMANN, August John (I19842)
 
10 "Dalmuir", 15 Holmes Street, North Ipswich, Queensland, Australia ANDERSON, Mary Wylie (I18191)
 
11 "Family Notices" The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) 28 October 1879: 12. Web. 2 Apr 2017 .

THE FRIENDS of the late GEORGE BANKS SUTTOR, Esq., are invited to attend his Funeral ; to move from his late residence, Chelsea Park, Baulkham Hills, on WEDNESDAY MORNING, at 10 o'clock. JAMES WILLIS. Undertaker. 
SUTTOR, George Banks (I10939)
 
12 "Herschel" left Hamburg April 1, 1874, arriving Moreton Bay, Queensland 14 July 1874.

KANOFSKI Johann, G. Teschendorf, West Preussen, Landmann, 48, Anna 48, Carl 14, Friedrich 8, Euphrosine 20, Wilhelmine 18, Caroline 16 
KANOFSKI, Johann (I20303)
 
13 "Kenilworth", Oxford St, Rockhampton, Queensland HALLETT, Emily Anna (I20394)
 
14 'Coromandel' with family as Free Settlers.
The 'Coromandel', a 522 ton East India sailing ship left Deptford, UK for the 15,263 nautical-mile voyage to Australia, it sailed into Port Jackson on 13 June 1802, setting a record of 121 days. This was the first non-stop voyage from Europe. 
JOHNSTON, William (I10834)
 
15 'Mulgrave Place,' Pitt Town, New South Wales JOHNSTON, Georgiana Julia (I10862)
 
16 'Spring Hill', McGraths Hill, New South Wales JOHNSTON, Mabel (I10905)
 
17 'Spring Hill', McGraths Hill, New South Wales JOHNSTON, Hylton Stanley (I10907)
 
18 'Spring Hill', McGraths Hill, New South Wales JOHNSTON, Bruce Hall (I10913)
 
19 'Spring Hill', McGraths Hill, New South Wales JOHNSTON, Eadyth Beatrice (I10916)
 
20 'Spring Hill', McGraths Hill, New South Wales JOHNSTON, Mabel (I10905)
 
21 'Spring Hill', McGraths Hill, New South Wales JOHNSTON, Elsie Maud (I10906)
 
22 'Terrigal', 18 Woodland St., Marrickville, NSW CLISSOLD, John (I18048)
 
23 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I13010)
 
24 (now called Szczecin, Poland) DEUTER, Rudolph Ferdinand (I16592)
 
25 (now Poland) DEUTER, Gottlieb (I16595)
 
26 (Prussia) BEINKE, Friedrich August (I16597)
 
27 1 Jun 1942 - 21 Oct 1945 MCLEAN, Robert Joseph Patrick (I3138)
 
28 1 May 1942 - 25 Feb 1944 LAKIN, Robert Charles Frederick (I602)
 
29 1 year old BEISSEL, James Blackburn (I16895)
 
30 1. 1927 2. 1931
1. Landers Shoot State School, Qld.
2. Laidley North State School, Qld. 
ROSSOW, Bertha Christine (I243)
 
31 10 Feb 1917 - 24 Jul 1919
Service Number: 1410
Embarked on 4 October 1917 via Southampton to France. Returned to Australia 3 July 1919. 
LEIGH, Frederick Robert (I2078)
 
32 10 months 17 days BEITZEL, Alice Martha Caroline (I15667)
 
33 10 pm, 646 American Avenue, 8th Ward, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Suicide by hanging
Buried Pilgrim's Rest June 2, 1920

Coroner's Report
Milwaukee County Historical Society. Box 531
BEITZEL Henry
INQUEST date: 30 May 1920
Lived: 646 American Avenue . . . lived here 32 years, in USA 32 years
Wife: Christine
Born 21 April 1844, 76 years 1 month 9 days, born Germany
Informant: Mr O Braeger, son-in-law
Died: May 30 1920, 10 pm by hanging
Pilgrims Rest by Chas A Frantz & Sons undertaker of 531 2nd Ave.
Report:
HENRY BEITZEL, 76 years old male, lived at 646 American Ave, committed suicide by hanging himself with a wash line, to a door knob in the basement of his home this evening. Body found hanging by son-in-law, Otto Braeger, at about 10 pm and he reported the case. He was despondent on account of ill health. 
BEITZEL, Heinrich Rudolph Theodor Christian (I9419)
 
34 105 Short Street, Balmain, Sydney, NSW, Australia WALKER, William Edward (I23)
 
35 106 SCHULZ Johann Bergenzin19 Pommern Landmann 29 m
107 SCHULZ Caroline Bergenzin Pommern Frau 29 f
108 SCHULZ Alwine Bergenzin Pommern Tochter 9 f
109 SCHULZ Wilhelmine Bergenzin Pommern Tochter 4 f 
HOEFT, Caroline (I16768)
 
36 11 months BEITZEL, Carl Martin (I15366)
 
37 13 Apr 1940 - 6 Sep 1943 DOEPKE, Esther Else Clara (I17013)
 
38 13 Apr 1940 - 6 Sep 1943 JOYCE, Henry Hartley Frederick (I1241)
 
39 13 Jul 1942 - 21 Feb 1946 STEPHAN, Cecil Percy (I1551)
 
40 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I16379)
 

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